Photo Guide for: SHETLAND ISLANDS

The Shetland Islands, a remote archipelago off the coast of Scotland, offer photographers a unique and stunning landscape.

 

With its dramatic coastline, towering cliffs, and abundant wildlife, the Shetlands are a photographer's dream. From the iconic Bressay Lighthouse to the breathtaking Hermaness Cliffs, there's so much to see and to capture with your camera.

 

Here are the 20 must-visit photo spots for the Shetlands (this map provides an overview. You can read the text below for all details about the photo spots, such as where to park and when to shoot).

 

Here is a sneak preview video with the best photos of the Shetland Islands. To get you in the mood to discover the photo spots.



How to reach the Shetland Islands

The Shetland Islands are a group of islands located in the North Atlantic Ocean, off the north coast of Scotland. They are part of the United Kingdom, but they are much closer to Norway than to mainland Scotland.

 

There are two main ways to reach the Shetland Islands: by ferry or by plane.

 

By ferry

The NorthLink ferry company operates a ferry service from Aberdeen on mainland Scotland to Lerwick, the capital of the Shetland Islands. The ferry journey takes approximately 12 hours. There are also ferry services from Kirkwall in Orkney to Lerwick, which take approximately 7 hours.

 

By plane

Loganair operates flights from Aberdeen, Edinburgh, and Glasgow to Sumburgh Airport in Shetland. The flight time from Aberdeen is approximately 1 hour and 15 minutes.

The flights between London Heathrow T2 and Sumburgh began in May 2023, taking just over three hours, the flight briefly touches down in Dundee, but passengers are not required to leave the aircraft.


How long do you need to discover the Shetlands?

Many photo locations require some walking and time, so a minimum of one week is needed to get a connection to the islands, but this won't be enough to see everything. Two weeks is ideal. If you only have time for a weekend, be selective and choose two or three favourite spots, and come back another time for the rest!

 

As you can see on the map, many photo spots are on the island of Unst. For me, it was the most beautiful part of the Shetlands. I recommend staying at least one night, or better still two or three, on Unst, as it takes two ferries to get there from the mainland, and you won't be able to enjoy all of Unst's highlights thoroughly in a shorter time.

 

A possible itinerary for a one-week Shetland trip could be to stay five nights on the mainland and two nights on Unst.


20 Must-Visit Photo Spots in the Shetlands

1. BRESSAY LIGHTHOUSE

Nestled on a clifftop overlooking the North Sea, Bressay Lighthouse is one of the most iconic landmarks in the Shetland Islands. With its dramatic setting and striking architecture, it's no wonder that this lighthouse is a popular destination for landscape photographers.

Bressay Lighthouse is located on the northeast tip of Bressay, a small island just a short ferry ride from Lerwick, the capital of Shetland. The lighthouse was built in 1855 to guide ships through the treacherous waters of Bressay Sound.

 

Bressay Island is the largest of the Shetland Islands and is home to a population of around 400 people. The island is known for its rugged coastline, rolling hills, and picturesque villages. 

 

How to get there:

The best way to get to Bressay Lighthouse is by ferry from Lerwick. The ferry crossing takes around 15 minutes and operates several times per day.

 

Best time:

The best time to photograph Bressay Lighthouse is in the morning, when the arch of the lighthouse is illuminated by the sun. If you are not staying overnight on Bressay Island, I recommend taking the first ferry from Lerwick to be able to still get a soft light.

 

Parking:

There is no real parking close to the lighthouse, but there is a small unofficial space in front of the gate of the lighthouse for 2 cars. 

 

Where to shoot:

Walk uphill left from the lighthouse and continue walking for about 10 minutes until you are quite far away, with this POV you can see the whole sea arch on which the lighthouse is built. You can also find a nice POV close to the edge of the cliff.

Be careful - there is a sheer drop, the cliffs are steep and might be unstable and overhanging, don't go too close to the edge.

 


2. Stenness beach

Stenness Beach is a beautiful and secluded beach located on the northern tip of the North Mainland of Shetland. It is known for its stunning scenery, dramatic coastline, and abundant wildlife. The beach is also home to a number of historical ruins, including the remains of an old fishing station. Stenness Beach was once a thriving fishing community. However, the fishing industry declined in the late 19th century, and the beach was eventually abandoned. 

 

 

How to get there:

Stenness Beach is located on the northern coast of Mainland Shetland, approximately 20 miles from Lerwick. To get to the beach, you can take the A971 north from Lerwick. Once you reach the village of Eshaness, follow the signs for Stenness Beach.

 

Best time:

The best time to shoot photos of Stenness Beach is during the golden hour, but you can take photos basically at any time of the day, especially on an overcast day.

 

Parking:

There is a small car park located at the entrance to Stenness Beach. The walk from the car park to the beach is about 2 minutes.

 

Where to shoot:

Explore the beach, there are plenty of possibilities to set the old fishing station in focus. 


3. Dore holm

Dore Holm is a small island located just off the coast of Mainland Shetland, Scotland. It forms a lovely sea arch which locals say is a horse drinking water from the sea.

One of the best places to photograph Dore Holm is from the viewpoint on the B9078, just before Stenness Beach.  

 

How to get there:

To get to the viewpoint on the B9078, simply follow the B9078 north from Lerwick. The viewpoint is located approximately 1 miles before Stenness Beach.

 

Best time:

Early morning or late evening is best, during the day you would have the sea arch backlit.

 

Parking:

Road side parking

 

Where to shoot:

Take a tripod and a long lens, the sea arch is quite a bit in the distance.  There is a little pond which you can take as the foreground.


4. Eshaness

Eshaness is a stunning headland located on the Northmavine peninsula in the Shetland Islands, Scotland. It is known for its dramatic cliffs, rugged coastline, and iconic lighthouse.  

The Eshaness cliffs have been shaped by millions of years of erosion. The cliffs are made up of a variety of rocks, including gneiss, schist, and quartzite. 
The lighthouse at Eshaness was built in 1929. It is a whitewashed tower that stands 12 meters tall. The lighthouse is now automated and is no longer staffed.
Attention - there is nothing but cliffs. No toilet, no EV charger, no cafe (the next cafe with toilet is 15 mins drive and the next rapid charger 20 mins; there is also no petrol station if you are wondering...)

 

How to get there:

Eshaness is located approximately 20 miles north of Lerwick. To get to Eshaness, simply follow the A971 north from Lerwick. Once you reach the village of Eshaness, follow the signs for the Eshaness Lighthouse.

 

Best time:

Sunset or a wild, stormy day will suit best this location. Best on a non-sunny day, otherwise you will have harsh shadows in the cliffs.

 

Parking:

There is a small car park located at the Eshaness Lighthouse. The walk from the car park to the viewpoint of the cliffs and the lighthouse is approx. 15 minutes.

 

Where to shoot:

The Eshaness cliffs: The cliffs at Eshaness are truly spectacular. You can take photos of the cliffs from different angles to capture their size and scale, best viewpoints are from the lighthouse and from the cliffs north of the lighthouse (15 minutes walk).

The Eshaness Lighthouse: The Eshaness Lighthouse is an iconic landmark. You can take photos of the lighthouse from the cliffs north of the lighthouse.


5. Hermaness

Hermaness Cliffs are located on the island of Unst in the Shetland Islands, Scotland. They are some of the highest cliffs in the British Isles, reaching a height of over 400 feet. The cliffs are home to a variety of wildlife, including puffins, guillemots, and razorbills.

 

The Hermaness Cliffs were formed by millions of years of erosion. The cliffs are made up of a variety of rocks, including gneiss, schist, and quartzite. The cliffs have been inhabited by humans for thousands of years. There is evidence of Neolithic settlements at Hermaness, and the cliffs were also used by Vikings.

 

How to get there:

Hermaness Cliffs are located approximately 30 miles north of Lerwick, the capital of Shetland. To get to Hermaness Cliffs, you have to take two ferries - from Shetland mainland to Yell and the second to Unst. Best to prebook your trip! Once you arrive in Baltasound on Unst, you can follow the signs for Hermaness Cliffs up north.

 

Best time:

All day long - it is always spectacular!

 

Parking:

There is a small car park located at the Hermaness National Nature Reserve Visitor Centre. The walk from the car park to the cliffs is at times steep and will take 30 - 45 minutes. To see different viewpoints (and the Muckle Flugga lighthouse, see next photospot), you can walk a loop which will take 2-3 hours (plus time to take photos).  

 

 

Where to shoot:

It's best to take a whole day to explore the cliffs. There are so many sea stacks, sea arches, puffins, and other seabirds to photograph, as well as rugged coastlines. You won't be disappointed!

 


6. Muckle Flugga lighthouse

Muckle Flugga Lighthouse is the most northerly lighthouse in Britain, standing on a jagged rock stack off the coast of Unst, Shetland Islands, Scotland. The lighthouse was built in 1854 to protect ships during the Crimean War, and it is now a popular destination for landscape photographers.

 

The viewpoint from the Hermaness cliffs is one of the best places to photograph Muckle Flugga Lighthouse. 

 

How to get there:

Hermaness Cliffs are located approximately 30 miles north of Lerwick, the capital of Shetland. To get to Hermaness Cliffs, you have to take two ferries - from Shetland mainland to Yell and the second to Unst. Best to prebook your trip! Once you arrive in Baltasound on Unst, you can follow the signs for Hermaness Cliffs up north.

 

Best time:

All day long - it is always spectacular! If you are there early in the morning, you can enjoy the beautiful landscape on your own. During the day it gets quite busy.

 

Parking:

There is a car park located at the Hermaness National Nature Reserve Visitor Centre. The walk from the car park to the viewpoint is approximately 2 (steep) miles on a board walk and takes about 45 minutes.
You can also do the loop - see photo spot "Hermaness" and combine it with the cliffs. This will make your walk 2-3 hours. 

 

Where to shoot:

Take your long lens, the lighthouse sits on an islet in the sea in the distance. 


7. The Viking unst project

The Viking Project on Unst in the Shetland Islands, Scotland, is a unique and fascinating place for landscape photographers. The project is a reconstruction of a Viking longhouse and ship, and it offers visitors a glimpse into the lives of the Vikings who once lived in Shetland.

The Viking Project was founded in 1999 by archaeologist and historian Dr. Tom Muir. Muir was inspired to start the project after excavating a Viking site on Unst. He wanted to create a place where people could learn about Viking culture and experience the way of life that the Vikings had in Shetland. 

 

How to get there:

To get to The Viking Project, you will need to take tow ferries from Mainland Shetland to Unst. The ferry journey takes approximately 75 minutes. Once you arrive on Unst, The Viking Project is located approximately 15 miles from the ferry terminal. 

 

Best time:

All day long - even rain is fine with this location.

 

Parking:

There is a car park located just next to The Viking Project. 

 

Where to shoot:

The longhouse from outside and from the inside, the ship - and try to connect both subject into one photo!

 

8. The Lodberrie

Lodberrie is a historic townhouse located in Lerwick, the capital of the Shetland Islands, Scotland. It is one of the oldest buildings in Lerwick and is now a popular tourist attraction. The house is famous for its unique architecture and its association with the Shetland detective series, "Shetland."

 

Lodberrie was built in the early 17th century by a wealthy merchant named John Robertson. The house was originally used as a warehouse, but it was later converted into a residence. Lodberrie is a fine example of traditional Shetland architecture, with its harled stone walls and crow-stepped gables.

 

 

How to get there:

Lodberrie is located at 20 Commercial Street, Lerwick, Shetland ZE1 0AN. It is a short walk from the town centre and ferry terminal. 

 

Best time:

All day long - also rain, overcast or storm. To avoid crowds, come very early.

 

Parking: 

There is a car park at Chromate Lane, from there it is a 5 minutes walk.

 

Where to shoot:

One of the best viewpoints for photos of Lodberrie is from the opposite side of Commercial Street. From this viewpoint, you will have a clear view of the house's front facade. Be mindful, it is a private residence!
Don't forget to walk along Commercial Street, it is a lovely old lane with plenty of photo-worthy buildings.

 


9 . The harbour and the mareel

Lerwick Harbour Area and Mareel are two of the most popular tourist destinations in the Shetland Islands, Scotland. The harbour area is a bustling hub of activity, with fishing boats, maritime monuments and a museum. Mareel is a state-of-the-art cinema and music venue that hosts a variety of events throughout the year.

 

Both the harbour area and Mareel offer stunning photo opportunities. The building's unique architecture makes it a standout subject.

 

 

How to get there:

Lerwick Harbour Area and Mareel are both located in the heart of Lerwick, the capital of the Shetland Islands. To get there, you can simply follow the signs for Lerwick Town Centre. Once you are in the town centre everything is within walking distance.

 

Best time:

All day long - also rain, overcast or storm. To avoid crowds, come very early.

 

Parking: 

There are car parks close to the Mareel.

 

Where to shoot:

Walk behind Mareel, passing monuments such as "The Receivers" and the museum, and continue onto the old pier. You'll find plenty of interesting maritime subjects to photograph in the foreground, with Mareel in the background. If you're lucky, there will even be reflections in the water!

 


10. Nesbister Camping Bod

Nesbister Camping Bod is a unique and atmospheric place to stay in the Shetland Islands, Scotland. It is one of the traditional Shetland fishing huts, known as böds, that have been converted into self-catering accommodation. Nesbister Camping Bod is located on a picturesque peninsula, with stunning views of the North Sea and the surrounding coastline.

 

How to get there:

Nesbister Camping Bod is located on the west coast of Mainland Shetland, approximately 15 miles of Lerwick, near Whiteness.

 

Best time:

Best to come in the evening for sunset or blue hour.

 

Parking: 

There is a small path you can drive down to the Bod until you reach a gate. Park in the grass and walk around the gate, from there you will need 5 minutes to reach the little bay and the Bod.

 

Where to shoot:

You can take some photos along the shore of the little bay, where you can sometimes capture lovely reflections.

It's also worth using a long lens to shoot near the gate, including the coastline and scenery in your photo together with the Bod. 


11. Isle of noss

Noss is one of the most iconic islands in the Shetland Islands, Scotland. It is home to a thriving colony of Atlantic puffins, as well as a variety of other seabirds, including guillemots, razorbills, and kittiwakes. Noss is probably the best place for spotting puffins in the Shetlands.

Noss is a privately owned island, but it is open to the public during the summer months. The island is managed by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), which works to protect the island's wildlife and habitats.

 

How to get there:

To get to Noss, you will need to take a ferry from Lerwick to Bressay and a boat trip in a small rib boat to the Isle.

The rib boat only runs if there is demand and on certain days only. Be sure to check their website or call their hotline to confirm if it is running before you go.

 

Best time:

All day, but allow yourself enough time to explore the isle without getting stuck on the Isle. You will need at least 3 hours.
The best time to visit Noss for taking photos is during the breeding season, which runs from April to August. During this time, the island is teeming with wildlife, and the puffins are particularly active.

 

Parking: 

The car park is above the jetty for the rib boat. It takes 5-10 minutes to walk down to the jetty.

Where to shoot:

Once you arrive on Noss, you need to walk up the steep cliffs to the other side of the island, where you can find the puffins. The RSPB staff will show you the way. The walk back and forth takes 1.5 to 2 hours, but you'll need time to watch the puffins, so I recommend taking at least 3 hours, or longer to enjoy everything. The walk is very steep and uneven in places, so a certain level of fitness is required.

 


12. Scalloway

Scalloway is the largest settlement on the west coast of Mainland Shetland, Scotland. It was once the capital of the Shetland Islands, and it is still a thriving community today. Scalloway is known for its picturesque harbor, its rich history, and its friendly people.

 

Scalloway was founded in the 17th century by Earl Patrick Stewart. Stewart built a castle in Scalloway, which became the seat of power for the Shetland Islands. Scalloway was also a major center for fishing and trade. In the 18th century, Scalloway was the base for the Shetland Bus, a clandestine operation that ferried supplies and resistance fighters between Shetland and Norway during World War II.

 

How to get there:

Scalloway is located approximately 10 miles west of Lerwick. To get to Scalloway from Lerwick, simply follow the A970. The car journey takes approximately 20 minutes.

 

Best time:

Evening and sunset is a lovely time to visit the town, when the houses and the castle are lit by the sun.

 

Parking: 

There is a large car park located in the center of Scalloway. The walk from the car park to the main attractions in the village takes approximately 5 minutes.

 

What to shoot:

Scalloway Castle: Scalloway Castle is a ruined 17th-century castle that was once the seat of power for the Shetland Islands. Shetland Bus Memorial: The Shetland Bus Memorial is a monument that commemorates the brave men and women who served on the Shetland Bus during World War II. 

Both subjects are best seen from the Main Street.

 


13. White Wife of Watlee

The White Wife of Watlee is a legendary ghost figure on the island of Unst in the Shetland Islands, Scotland. She is said to haunt the road near Loch Watlee, and there have been many sightings of her over the years.

 

The legend of the White Wife dates back centuries. There are many different versions of the story, but one of the most common is that she was the ghost of a bride who was murdered on her wedding night. Another version of the story is that she is the ghost of a woman who drowned in Loch Watlee.

 

They have erected a statue of the White Wife near the loch, which can be very eerie to see on a gloomy, foggy day (or night).

 

 

How to get there:

The White Wife of Watlee statue is located on the island of Unst, in the Shetland Islands. To get to Unst, you will need to take two ferries from Mainland Shetland. The ferry journey takes approximately 75 minutes.

Once you arrive on Unst, the White Wife of Watlee statue is located 4 miles up north direction Baltasound from the ferry terminal. You can see it along the A968.

 

Best time:

A foogy and gloomy day to enhance the eerie atmosphere.

 

Parking: 

Roadside parking just next to the statue.

 

What to shoot:

The statue of the White Wife of Watlee is a unique and fascinating attraction. It is a great place to learn about the island's folklore and to experience the gloomy side of the Shetland landscape.

In addition to the statue, there are a number of other things to see and do in the area. You can visit the Loch Watlee Nature Reserve, which is home to a variety of birds and wildlife.

 


14. Muness castle

Muness Castle is a striking 16th-century tower house located on the island of Unst in the Shetland Islands, Scotland. It is one of the most northerly fortified buildings in Britain and is known for its dramatic setting and well-preserved architecture.

 

Muness Castle has a long and turbulent history. It was attacked and besieged on several occasions, and it was eventually abandoned in the 18th century. The castle fell into disrepair, but it was restored in the early 20th century and is now managed by Historic Environment Scotland.

 

 

How to get there:

To get to Muness Castle, you will need to take two ferries from Mainland Shetland to Unst. The ferry journey takes approximately 75 minutes. Once you arrive on Unst, the castle is located approximately 3 miles east of the village of Uyeasound. You can follow the signs for Muness Castle from the village.

 

Best time:

A foogy and gloomy day to enhance the bleak atmosphere.

 

Parking: 

There is a small car park just next to the castle.

 

What to shoot:

The small road can be used effectively as a leading line to the castle. The castle is also photogenic from the back, where you can go through a gate and walk around the castle, using some of the old stones as a foreground. 


15. Uyeasound

Uyeasound is a small village located on the east coast of the island of Unst in the Shetland Islands, Scotland. The Petite Cafe with Honesty Box is a unique and charming cafe near the jetty with some chairs outside, next to the sea. It is a quirky little photo spot.

 

How to get there:

To get to Uyeasound, you will need to take two ferries from Mainland Shetland to Unst. The ferry journey takes approximately 75 minutes. Once you arrive on Unst, Uyeasound is located approximately 3 miles east of the ferry terminal. You can follow the signs for Uyeasound from the ferry terminal.

 

Best time:

Any time.

 

Parking:

 

 

 

 

You can park on the road side close to the cafe.

 

What to shoot:

The quirky cafe with its small tables and chairs is a classic example of Shetland culture, and provides a great opportunity for a photo. The old houses along the bay are also worth photographing for their atmosphere.

 


16. St Olaf's Kirk

St Olaf's Kirk is a ruined medieval church located on the island of Unst in the Shetland Islands, Scotland. 

 

St Olaf's Kirk is a significant historical site for a number of reasons. First, it is one of the oldest surviving buildings on Unst. Second, it is one of the few remaining examples of a Norse church in the Shetland Islands. Third, the church is associated with Saint Olaf, a highly revered figure in Norwegian history.

 

 

How to get there:

To get to Uyeasound, you will need to take two ferries from Mainland Shetland to Unst. The ferry journey takes approximately 75 minutes. Once you arrive on Unst, the church is located approximately 0.5 miles northwest of the hamlet of Lund. You might need to open a few gates to drive to the church, please close them immediately again once you have passed them, there is livestock!

 

Best time:

Any time, best on a gloomy day.

 

Parking: 

The church has a car park.

 

What to shoot:

Walk through the graveyard and position yourself behind the church and the gravestones to capture the old stones, the church, and the beautiful coastal scenery in the background.

 


17. Shetland Croft Museum

The Croft House Museum in the Shetland Islands is a unique and atmospheric place to learn about the traditional way of life in the Shetlands. The museum is located in a restored 19th-century croft house, which is a traditional Shetland cottage. The museum is furnished and decorated in the style of the 1870s, and it offers visitors a glimpse into what life was like for crofters in the Shetland Islands during this time period.

 

 

How to get there:

The Croft House Museum is located in Dunrossness, Shetland Islands, Scotland. To get to the museum, you can take the A970 road from Lerwick down south. The museum is located approximately 15 miles of Lerwick.

 

Best time:

Please inform yourself about the opening times of the museum, if it is closed, you cannot take photos, not even from the outside.

 

Parking:

The museum has a small car park.

 

What to shoot:

You can explore the croft house and learn about the lives of the crofters who once lived there. You can also see a variety of traditional Shetland crafts and tools.

From the outside you can take atmospheric photos of a typical and traditional Shetland cottage.

 


18. Sumburgh Head

Sumburgh Head is a dramatic headland located on the southern tip of the Shetland Islands, Scotland. It is known for its towering cliffs, rugged coastline, and abundant wildlife. Sumburgh Head is also home to the Sumburgh Head Lighthouse, which has been guiding ships safely through the treacherous waters of the North Sea for over 200 years.

 

You can also spot puffins at the right time of the year (April to August).

 

 

How to get there:

Sumburgh Head is located approximately 15 miles south of Lerwick, the capital of the Shetland Islands. To get to Sumburgh Head, you can take the A970 road south from Lerwick. The drive takes approximately 30 minutes.
The viewpoint with the cliff is before you reach the lighthouse car park.

 

Best time:

If you want to shoot the lighthouse, best to come for sunrise or sunset or early evening.

 

Parking: 

You can find roadside parking. Walk down the cliff to find your favourite spot. It will be 5 to 10 minutes walk down.

 

What to shoot:

The Sumburgh Head Cliffs are some of the highest cliffs in Britain. You can take a walk along the cliffs and enjoy the spectacular views of the North Sea and the lighthouse. There are also many stonewalls and stiles you can place in the foreground. 

 


19. St Ninian's beach

St Ninian's Beach is a beautiful and secluded beach located on the west coast of Mainland Shetland, Scotland. It is known for its white sand, crystal-clear water, and stunning views of St Ninian's Isle, a small island that is connected to the mainland by a tombolo, a natural causeway of sand and gravel.

 

 

How to get there:

St Ninian's Beach is located approximately 17 miles south west of Lerwick. The drive takes approximately 30 minutes.

 

Best time:

St Ninian's Beach is a particularly beautiful place to visit during sunset. The golden light of the setting sun reflects off the white sand and clear water, creating a truly magical scene.

 

Parking: 

There is a small car park located next to St Ninian's Beach. The walk from the car park to the beach takes approximately 2 minutes.

 

What to shoot:

To get an overview of the beach and the causeway, try to get an elevated POV by climbing the dunes.

 


20. Westerwick

The Westerwick Cliffs are a series of towering red sandstone cliffs located on the west coast of Mainland Shetland, Scotland. The Westerwick Cliffs are thought to have been formed over 400 million years ago. The cliffs are made up of red sandstone, which was deposited by a river delta. The cliffs have been eroded by the sea over time, creating the dramatic landscape that we see today.

Apart from sheep, you will probably not meet any other human soul. Just breathtaking.

 

 

How to get there:

The Westerwick Cliffs are located approximately on the west coast of Shetland. The drive from Lerwick takes approximately 30 minutes.

 

Best time:

The Westerwick Cliffs are a particularly beautiful place to visit during sunset. The golden light of the setting sun reflects off the red sandstone cliffs, creating a truly magical scene. 

 

Parking: 

There is a small car park located next to the Westerwick Cliffs with space for 4-5 cars. The main viewpoint is only a 10 minutes walk, but it is highly recommended to follow the walking path along the cliffs to discover more stunning views. It is at times steep and uneven and there is livestock free roaming.

 

What to shoot:

The main viewpoint is located at the first bay from the car park. Nature has perfectly arranged several sea stacks here for a nice composition. If you walk further up the cliffs, you can find more sea stacks, bays, and breathtaking views along the coastline.

 


I fell deeply in love with Shetland, and unexpectedly so. My expectations were exceeded many times over. From the landscape to the calm and relaxed atmosphere, but above all the locals, who are so friendly, welcoming, and outgoing.

 

The weather is changeable and can be gloomy and stormy at times, but we also had really warm and even hot days. Just be prepared for a lot of wind, even on a sunny and warm summer day.

 

Don't rush, the islands are worth taking your time on. Stay at least a week and indulge in this truly special atmosphere, unique in Europe.

 

Here are some additional tips for planning your trip to Shetland:

 

The best time to visit Shetland is during the summer months (June-August), when the weather is mild and there are long days. However, the islands are beautiful year-round, and each season has its own unique charm, especially for landscape photography can be the stormy season a haven.

 

Shetland is a remote archipelago, so it is important to plan your travel carefully. There are regular flights and ferry services to and from the mainland, but it is important to book your tickets in advance, especially during the summer months.

 

Shetland is a relatively small archipelago, but there is a lot to see and do. I recommend staying in at least two different locations during your trip, so that you can explore different parts of the islands.

 

If you need a camera break: Shetland is a great place to get outdoors and enjoy the natural beauty. There are many hiking trails, biking trails, and coastal walks to choose from. You can also go kayaking, fishing, and birdwatching.

 

Shetland is a unique place with a rich culture and heritage. Be sure to visit some of the local museums and historical sites, and try some of the traditional Shetland cuisine.

 

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